Do It Yourself: Clubwear

Save
Make some do-it-yourself clubwear.
Make some do-it-yourself clubwear. (Image: Ryan McVay/Lifesize/Getty Images)

Clubwear is sexy and provocative, but also can be pretty expensive. Luckily, you can make clubwear yourself for the price of two T-shirts. You will need a fitted one that is your size and a boxy one that is larger. The shirts don’t have to be the same color, but it's preferable that they don’t have any printing on them. You can turn these T-shirts into a club-worthy dress that can be enhanced with jewelry, chains and belts.

Things You'll Need

  • Large T-shirt
  • Scissors
  • Fitted T-shirt
  • Pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread

Lay the large T-shirt flat in front of you. Cut a line with the scissors starting from the right side of the collar to under the left sleeve. Remove the collar and the sleeve.

Cut the hem off the right sleeve. Cut a slit in the top of the sleeve from the bottom to 1/2 inch from the seam. Cut off the hem of the T-shirt.

Lay the fitted T-shirt flat in front of you. Cut straight across the shirt from underarm to underarm. This will become the skirt of the dress.

Sew two rows of basting stitch, 1/8 inch apart, 1/4 inch from the bottom edge of the large shirt on the sewing machine. Leave the ends of the basting stitch threads long. Pull the ends of the threads of the basting stitches, gathering the shirt until it is the same distance around as the cut edge of the fitted shirt.

Turn the large shirt inside out. Pin the gathered hem of the large shirt to the cut edge of the fitted shirt, with right sides facing each other. Sew the shirts together on the sewing machine 1/2 inch from the edge using a zigzag or stretch stitch.

Fold the edge of the cut neckline down 1/4 inch, with wrong sides facing each other, and pin it in place. Sew the fold down using a zigzag or a stretch stitch.

Fold the bottom edge of the sleeve and the edges of the slit in the sleeve in 1/4 inch, with wrong sides facing each other, and pin it in place. Sew the folds down using a zigzag or a stretch stitch.

Related Searches

References

  • “Guide to Fashion Sewing”; Connie Amaden-Crawford; 1986
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

Related Searches

Check It Out

This Is the Beauty Routine of an Ex-Pat in China

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!