How to Use Furring Strips

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Furring strips are thin strips of lumber commonly used in the construction of renovated basements. Contractors use them between the foundation walls and the drywall to create an air space to allow air to flow between the walls. Furring strips help to prevent mold. They come in several different sizes, such as 2 inches thick by 2 inches wide or somewhat larger, such as 2 inches thick by 3 inches wide. Since most foundations are made of brick or block, be prepared to attach furring strips to these materials.

Things You'll Need

  • Construction adhesive
  • 2-by-4-inch lumber
  • Hand drill
  • Masonry bit
  • Fluted nails
  • 5-lb. sledgehammer
  • 2-by-3-inch furring strips
  • Miter saw
  • Place a bead of construction adhesive along the wall approximately 2 inches above the surface of the floor. This helps seat the framing boards until you can install the fasteners.

  • Place the flat sides of 2-by-4-inch boards along the bottom of the wall with the thin side of the boards resting on the floor. Butt each board next to each other. The boards press against the wood glue.

  • Drill a hole though the face of each board with a hand drill and masonry drill bit that measures slightly smaller in diameter than the fluted nails you plan to use. Make the holes at least 1 ½ inches deep into the foundation wall. Drive the fluted nail into the hole with a 5-lb. sledgehammer. Repeat the process by drilling a hole every 16 inches and then by driving a nail into each hole. Do one nail at a time to ensure you have no alignment issues.

  • Cut a furring strip to match the distance between the top of the framing board to the bottom of the ceiling. Use a miter saw to cut the wood.

  • Place a bead of construction adhesive down the center of the furring strip on its flat side. Place the first furring strip in the corner of one wall. The construction adhesive holds the strip in place.

  • Place a bead of construction adhesive down the center of the second furring strip on its flat side. Press the board against the wall 16 inches away from the first board. This ensures your drywall lines up with the furring strips. Repeat this for every furring strip until you reach the end of the wall. Remember to space every strip 16 inches apart.

  • Drill a hole though the face of each board with a hand drill and masonry drill bit that measures slightly smaller in diameter than the fluted nails you plan to use. Secure the board to the wall with the fluted nails just as you did the framing board. Retain a 16-inch spacing for each nail as you work your way down each board.

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