How to Write an Exit Interview When You Hate Your Boss

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Offer your boss professional criticism and suggestions during the exit interview.
Offer your boss professional criticism and suggestions during the exit interview. (Image: Polka Dot Images/Polka Dot/Getty Images)

When you leave a job, the exit interview is your opportunity to voice your opinions and concerns regarding the position. If you’re leaving the job with malice toward your boss, however, you might be tempted to vent that malice during the exit interview. This is a bad idea, especially if you want anyone to take your review seriously. Dial down your emotions before writing the official interview. Consider the exit interview as your opportunity to offer professional feedback to your boss, presenting your discontent with his performance as avenues for improvement. Be sure to support each grievance with specific occurrences that substantiate why your boss is lacking.

Identify why you hate your boss. In the beginning, these reasons can be personal or professional. Personal reasons for hating your boss, such as jealousy, his clothing style or other concerns unrelated to work don’t belong on the exit interview, but knowing they exist allows you to consciously exclude them from it.

Determine which grievances are professional and which are personal. Treat the exit interview as your opportunity to address professional concerns, according to the website Resume Machine. Cultivate and understand what professional reasons you have for hating your boss, such as his stifling your ambitions or ignoring your ideas or ignoring your good performance while tolerating serious negative issues, according to the website Change Factory. Professional grievances and criticisms belong in the exit interview.

Vent your anger by creating a practice exit interview on your own time. Externalizing frustrations by writing or verbalizing them helps relieve stress and ensures that personal grievances don’t influence professional performance. Internalized stress can often surface at inopportune times, according to the website Easy Stress Reduction. Air your every qualm, argument, hatred and any other problem you’ve ever had with your boss. Perhaps writing is the best media for you, but speaking or even yelling could help you alleviate personal hatreds. After venting, you will be more likely to let go of personal reasons for hating your boss and will focus on professional matters during the exit interview.

Calm yourself mentally and physically. Exercise has an antidepressant effect and can be an effective way to reduce work-related stress. Exercise can also help fight depression and may help reduce anxiety. Combine exercise with a proper diet of complex carbohydrates, proteins and essential fatty acids, then supplement it with antioxidants like Vitamins C and E, as well as beta carotene and the minerals selenium and zinc, according to City University of New York. Exercise and a proper diet help to naturally calm your mind and body and will put you in the best frame of mind possible before completing your exit interview. Try jogging or practicing yoga and eating fresh fruits and vegetables in the days before your exit interview.

Write the exit interview. Think carefully about what you are going to write because it could jeopardize any possibility of rejoining the company in a different capacity, if that is something you’re interested in. You should be diplomatic, even if you are assured that your comments will not be used against you, according to the website Resume Machine. As you complete the interview with criticisms of your boss, be sure to support each grievance with specific occurrences that substantiate why your boss is lacking. Remember, too, that the exit interview is often your prerogative. If you don’t feel you can be professional, you can always ask not to complete the interview.

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