How to Automatically Quantize in Logic 9

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Apple Logic Pro 9 is a professional audio recoding, mixing and editing program exclusively for Mac OS X. If you use Logic to record MIDI (digital music note input), you can command Logic to automatically quantize your notes based on your desired parameters. If you record raw audio, you can also manipulate the waveforms for more precise timing. "Quantizing" refers to the process of adjusting the timing of your music notes, so that each one plays in perfect synchronization with the beat.

  • Open Logic Pro 9. If you do not see your "Arrange" window on your screen, click "Window, "Arrange" on the menu bar. Your "Arrange" window contains a horizontal layout of all of your audio and MIDI tracks (recording layers), appearing as long strips on a grid. In the left column, your track names will appear, such as "INST 1" and "AUDIO 1."

  • Click the "View" menu on your "Arrange" window menu bar. Click "Flex View." To quantize automatically in Logic, you must first access the program's "Flex Mode" feature.

  • Click the track to which you want to apply an automatic quantizing effect. Remember, each track contains a layer of recording material, (such as guitar, bass or vocals), and you can apply the command to as many tracks as you want. When selecting a track, click the title in the left column to highlight the entire track.

  • Click the title of your track inside the gray "Inspector" column near the upper-left corner of your screen. For instance, if you clicked the track entitled "AUDIO 6," the Inspector heading will also read "AUDIO 6." When you click it, a drop-down list will appear with a series of options.

  • Click the "Quantize" pop-up menu. By default, it will look like a horizontal bubble indicated by the words "1/192-Note." Select your timing preference. For instance, if your song has a standard 4/4 time signature, and you want to quantize with one note on each beat, select "1/4-Note" from the list. For faster songs with a lot of notes, you might select "1/16-Note" (four notes per beat). For a 3/4 time signature, you might try "1/3-Note." You can experiment with different configurations until your notes align perfectly with the beat.

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