How to Cite a URL in 6.0 APA

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The APA (American Psychological Association) specifies how URLs should be cited in APA style in its Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. This style requires that authors cite the work of anyone whose ideas, research or theories they use in their writing even if they do not directly quote the work. The citations in the text direct readers to the reference at the end of your work where complete information about the URL is provided.

Things You'll Need

  • Publication Manual of APA
  • References for URLs

Digital Object Identifiers

  • Place citations in your text as you are writing. If the source is from one of the digital object identifiers (DOIs) insert the last name of the author and the year of publication. For example:

    The researcher (Jones, 2010) determined ...

    Jones (2010) determined...

    In 2010, Jones determined...

  • Insert citations for articles on the web by two or more authors in one of the following ways:

    The researchers (Manning, Crooks & Adams, 2001)...

    Manning, Crooks and Adams (2001)...

    In 2001, Manning, Crooks and Adams...

  • When you find a number of authors who support a statement you list them alphabetically by the surname of the first author, as follows: Most experts (Benning, 2010; Chestnut, Webb & Peters, 2003; Maxwell, Denis, Jobs & Phillips, 2006)...

  • The first time you mention a source, include the names of all the authors. The researchers (Chestnut, Webb & Peters, 2003)...

  • In subsequent citations use the name of the first author followed by et al. For example, Chestnut et al., 2003 stated...

Quotations

non DOI websites

  • Include websites in the text, as follows: "You can find information about APA style on www.apastyle.org."

  • Cite references from websites that are not part of DOI by providing the website, year, month and day retrieved. The American Psychological Association has information about graduate schools (www.apastyle.org, 2009, March, 31).

  • Provide the author's surname, year and date of publication for journals that are only published on the Internet. (Matthews, 2003, January 5).

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References

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