How to Juice Leeks

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Leeks contain relatively little juice in their fibrous cell walls; one large leek yields about 1 tablespoon of juice. You can use a masticating juicer to juice leeks, but the fibers in the outer layers can wrap around the auger and affect its performance. You have to go old-school on leeks and use the pureeing, straining and wringing method. Leeks are milder than onions and contain less sulfoxides, but they're still pungent, so a little juice goes a long way. If juicing leeks for a vegetable smoothie, add leek juice to taste at the finish.

Things You'll Need

  • Food processor
  • Sieve
  • Cheesecloth
  • Trim off the hairy root end of the leeks and the leafy tops. Slice the leek in half lengthwise and separate the layers.

  • Rinse the dirt from the layers and chop them crosswise into 1/4- to 1/2-inch-wide pieces. Transfer the chopped leeks to a food processor; only fill the processor halfway.

  • Process the leeks on high until liquified. Add a spoonful of warm water if needed to facilitate pureeing.

  • Transfer the pureed leeks to a sieve lined with 3 layers of cheesecloth and set it over a bowl. Add another batch of chopped leeks to the food processor.

  • Continue pureeing the chopped leeks in batches and transferring them to the sieve. Press the peek puree with a rubber spatula.

  • Scrape the bottom of the sieve with the tip of the spatula to clear the leek fibers away and press on the fibers again. Continue scraping and pressing until you've extracted all the juice you can.

  • Bring the corners of the cheesecloth together and twist it to wring as much juice as you can from the fibers.

  • Pour the leek juice through a sieve lined with 2 or 3 layers of fresh cheesecloth if you need to filter out any fibers that made it through. Store leek juice in the refrigerator up to 24 hours.

References

  • Photo Credit graletta/iStock/Getty Images
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