How to Make a Wind Chime From Copper Pipe

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Wind chimes made from copper pipes can add a melodic tranquility to outdoor living. They produce a soothing, robust sound, which is not overpowering, but loud enough to be heard beneath light conversation and recreation. Making copper pipe wind chimes is relatively simple and straight forward; all the parts can be found at a hardware store. Personalize the wind chimes by adding sentimental trinkets, bead work or crystals.

Things You'll Need

  • 4-by-4 section of pine wood
  • Protractor
  • Pencil
  • 8-foot piece of copper pipe
  • Pipe cutter
  • Drill with bits
  • Safety goggles
  • Handsaw
  • Sand paper
  • Monofilament line
  • Scissors
  • Polyurethane
  • Thick rope
  • Draw a large circle with the protractor and pencil on the pine wood. Cut the circle out with the handsaw. Using the sandpaper, smooth the edges of the wood circle.

  • Brush one layer of polyurethane on both sides of the wood. Let it dry for one hour. Sand both sides lightly, and apply another coat of polyurethane. Let the wood dry for another hour.

  • Cut the copper pipe into five different lengths with the pipe cutter. The pipes can be cut to any length desired; different lengths will produce a variety of pitches.

  • Drill through each of the pipes, so that there are two equal holes on one end of the pipe. Drill the holes about a ½ inch from the end.

  • Drill 10 small holes around the pine circle. The holes should be in groups of two, and the groups should be equally spaced around the circle. Drill a slightly bigger hole in the top of the circle

  • Cut the microfilament into five lengths of about 1 ½ feet. String the microfilament through one pipe. Pull both ends of the microfilament through two holes in the disc. Pull the pipe so that it sits about 5 inches below the disc. Knot the microfilament so that it cannot slide through. String the rest of the pipes in this manner.

  • Pass one end of the rope through the center of the disc. Tie a knot so that the rope cannot pull through the top. On the other end, form a loop and knot it, as well. This rope will act as a hanger for the wind chime.

  • Hang the wind chime in a breezy outdoor space, but keep it out of harsh weather.

Tips & Warnings

  • To add a traditional harmonic to the wind chime, experiment with different sizes of copper pipe and try to tune them to a chord on a piano.
  • Always wear safety goggles when working with a drill.
  • Photo Credit Comstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images
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