How to Remove the Freon in a R134A

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R134a -- also known as Tetrafluoroethane (CF3CH2F) from the family of HFC refrigerant -- is a compound that is used as a cooling agent in refrigerators, air-conditioning equipments and other cooling systems. R134A refrigerant replaced freon which was used in most cooling systems prior to its phaseout. Freon can damage the ozone, and R-134a is a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. The removal of both refrigerants from any cooling system is regulated in the U.S. by the Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA.

Things You'll Need

  • AC gauge set
  • Refrigerant recovery vacuum pump
  • Recovery tank
  • Plug the vacuum recovery pump into a socket or power source. Plug the middle (yellow) hose of the AC gauge to the in-port nozzle on the vacuum pump. Take the blue hose attached to the low pressure side of the AC gauge, and plug it to the low side on your AC line.

  • Hold the red hose attached to the high side of the AC gauge, and plug the hose to the high side fitting on your AC line. In case there are small valves on the quick release fittings on the hoses, twist the valve handles counterclockwise to open them up. Open the blue and red valves on the AC gauge, and quickly close the valves to momentarily purge the air from both hoses.

  • Hold the extra yellow hose in the AC gauge kit, and hook it up to the "out-port" nozzle on the vacuum recovery pump. Plug the other end of the hose to the top inlet nozzle on the recovery tank. Open the blue and red valve knobs on the AC gauge, and notice the needle on the AC gauge go up.

  • Turn the vacuum recovery pump on and watch the needles on the red and blue gauges begin to drop. Allow the pump run until both needles have dropped, indicating complete removal, or evacuation of the freon in the air conditioning unit.

  • Turn off the vacuum pump, and close the recovery tank valve. Detach the yellow hose from the recovery tank, and unscrew the yellow hose from the vacuum pump. Close all the valves on the AC gauges, and detach the red and blue hoses from the AC line.

Tips & Warnings

  • You can not legally evacuate refrigerants until you are EPA certified.

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References

  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images
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