How to Reinstate Rights After a Felony in Florida

Save

If you are convicted of a felony in Florida, you lose several of your civil rights, including the right to vote, serve on a jury, run for public office or hold various state-issued occupational licenses (e.g., to work as a pawnbroker or motor-vehicle, mobile-home or recreational-vehicle dealer). Depending on the felony offense, these rights may not be restored unless you obtain a special form of clemency from the state of Florida.

Level I Approval

  • Complete all the terms of your sentence for a nonviolent offense. This includes any supervisory period imposed on you after your sentence is complete.

  • Complete any mandated process of restitution. If you are required to pay funds to a victim or make any other form of repayment, you must comply with these terms of your sentence before your rights can be restored.

  • Make sure you do not face any additional pending charges for other offenses beyond the felony for which you were convicted. Such charges will render you ineligible for restoration of civil rights.

  • Submit an optional Restoration of Civil Rights Data Worksheet to ensure that the Florida authorities have your correct and current address on file. A certificate attesting to the restoration of your rights will be mailed to that address.

Level II Approval

  • Complete all the terms of your sentence for an offense more severe than those at Level I. (Murder convictions and those for sex offenses do not qualify at Level II.) This includes any supervisory period imposed on you after your sentence is complete.

  • Complete any mandated process of victim restitution. You must comply with these terms of your sentence before your rights can be restored.

  • Apply to the Clemency Board for restitution of your civil rights. Complete the mandatory Restoration of Civil Rights Data Worksheet and submit it either by mail or through the Clemency Board's online form. Choose to submit written documentation so you can keep copies of your paperwork and show proof of your completed application. Obtain letters of support from your current or past employers, your church and social or community organizations in which you are involved. Avoid using family members to provide references; their letters will be less than influential. A letter from a victim or victim's family member can be highly effective. Express your remorse in writing, making sure to focus on your desire to regain your full civil rights and participate in society, and include that statement with your application.

  • Contact the Office of Executive Clemency 2 weeks after you mail your Restoration of Civil Rights Data Worksheet and supporting documentation. Make sure your documents have been received.

  • Stay in touch with the Office of Executive Clemency throughout the 1- to 2-year process of rights restoration. Your rights may be restored without a hearing. If they are not, you will be informed that your case must be reviewed further.

  • Attend the hearing of the Board of Executive Clemency if your rights are not restored without one. While your attendance is not mandatory, it demonstrates your commitment to regaining your full civil rights and gives you the ability to communicate directly with the Board about your case.

Level III Approval

  • Complete all the terms of your sentence for an offense more severe than those at Level II. (Level III includes murder convictions, individuals designated as sexual predators and those with sex-offense convictions.) This includes any supervisory period imposed on you after your sentence is complete.

  • Complete any mandated process of victim restitution. If you are required to pay funds to a victim or make other restitution, you must comply with these terms of your sentence before your rights can be restored.

  • Apply to the Clemency Board for restitution of your civil rights. Complete the mandatory Restoration of Civil Rights Data Worksheet and submit it either by mail or through the Clemency Board's online form. Choose to submit written documentation so you can keep copies of your paperwork and show proof of your completed application. Obtain letters of support from current or past employers, your church and social or community organizations in which you are involved. Avoid family members' references; their letters will be less than influential. A letter from a victim or victim's family member can be extremely effective. Express your remorse in writing, making sure to focus on your desire to regain your full civil rights and participate in society; include the statement with your application.

  • Contact the Office of Executive Clemency 2 weeks after you mail your Restoration of Civil Rights Data Worksheet and supporting documentation. Make sure your documents have been received.

  • Stay in touch with the Office of Executive Clemency throughout the 1- to 2-year process of rights restoration. Restoration of your rights will require a full investigation by a local Parole Examiner and a hearing before the Board of Executive Clemency.

  • Attend the hearing of the Board of Executive Clemency at which restoration of your rights is considered. While your attendance is not mandatory, it demonstrates your commitment to regaining your full civil rights and gives you the ability to communicate directly with the Board about your case.

References

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

Resources

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Read Article

10 Most Needed Jobs in the Future

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!