How to Convert Baking Time to Microwave Time

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Baking in a microwave usually requires a little trial and error before it can be done successfully.
Baking in a microwave usually requires a little trial and error before it can be done successfully.

Microwave ovens don't evaporate liquids like a regular oven does, so the liquid and fat content in a regular recipe needs to be reduced by about 20 percent. The key to converting a recipe to microwave use is experimentation. Unfortunately, there is no hard-and-fast rule, so trial and error will be a useful tool. Remember, too, that an item taken out of the microwave will continue to cook at least 20 percent more.

Instructions

    • 1

      Look for a microwave recipe that is similar to the conventional recipe you want to bake. You can find many microwave recipes on the Internet, according to "Microwave Cooking for One" author Marie Smith.

    • 2

      Reduce the liquid called for in your recipe by a quarter to help with the lack of evaporation in the microwave.

    • 3

      Reduce the amount of salt and seasonings called for in your recipe by about half. The microwave intensifies flavors, so a little salt in a regular baking recipe could make your cake very salty when prepared in the microwave.

    • 4

      Reduce the cooking time recommended by your recipe to a quarter -- so a cake that is supposed to bake for 40 minutes in the regular oven should only bake for 10 minutes in a microwave. Increase the time, if necessary, after pulling the cake out.

    • 5

      Use 100-percent power on the microwave for foods that need to be cooked at 425 to 500 degrees F in a conventional oven. Use 70-percent microwave power for 350 degrees F and 50-percent power for 300 degrees F.

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References

  • Photo Credit microwave image by andrey polichenko from Fotolia.com

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