How to Replace the Strips Between Concrete in a Driveway

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If you've ever had the wooden trim divider located between the slabs of concrete in your driveway warp, buckle or come undone in any fashion, you know how unsightly it can become. In some cases, if it's warped badly enough, it can become a tripping hazard. Because these dividers are made from wood they are subject to the elements, especially excessive heat and moisture. These factors, along with a stray tree root, can cause upheaval. Fortunately, replacing these dividers is fairly easy.

Things You'll Need

  • Tape measure
  • Pen and pad
  • Hand shovel
  • Hatchet (possible)
  • Wooden dividers
  • Divider nails
  • Mallet

Remove the old dividers. If the divider is merely warped or buckled, pull it out by hand. However, if your old divider has dry-rotted you will have to dig out the remaining pieces with a hand shovel. Once you have removed all of the old divider run your finders along the dirt between the slabs to feel for roots. If you discover a root, chop it out with a hatchet. The blade of a hatchet is thin enough to get between the slabs to remove any pieces of root.

Measure the width of your driveway and write this number in a pad. Also measure the width of the crack between your pieces of driveway slab. Typically, that gap is approximately 1/4-inch, but it may vary. Write this measurement down. These measurements will tell you what thickness your new dividers need to be and what lengths they need to be cut in so you can place them in your driveway.

Purchase new wood dividers based on the measurements you took. Also purchase divider nails. These are nails specially designed to be used on these thin wooden dividers.

Lay the dividers in the space between your driveway slabs. Knock them into place with the mallet first to seat them.

Fasten the dividers down by hammering the divider nails into the slats. You shouldn't need more than four of them spaced evenly across the width of your driveway for each divider.

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References

  • Driveways, Paths and Patios: A Complete Guide to Design, Management and Construction; 2006; Tony McCormack
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