How to Dispute My Driving History

If you've been turned down for car insurance or a special driver's license such as a chauffeur's license, or if your local Department of Motor Vehicles has denied the renewal of your driver's license and you don't know why, you may suspect that there are errors on your official driving history report. You may dispute your driving history report by obtaining an official copy and contacting your local DMV.

Things You'll Need

  • Copy of your official driving history report
  • Pencil

Instructions

    • 1

      Obtain a copy of your official driving history report. You can get this at your local DMV office, either in person or by writing to the office and having it mailed to you.

    • 2

      Examine your driving history report carefully. Use a light pencil mark to place a check next to anything that is wrong on the report.

    • 3

      Write a formal appeal to your state's DMV. In the appeal, explain the items in the report that are wrong and the reasons that you believe they are wrong.

    • 4

      Make photocopies of any evidence you may have to support your appeal, such as photos, court records and statements from others. Include those photocopies with your written appeal.

    • 5

      Call your local DMV office to get the address of the state DMV. You can get your local DMV's phone number out of the phone book by calling 411 for information.

    • 6

      Mail your written appeal, including the accompanying evidence, to your state DMV.

    • 7

      Wait 30 to 60 days while your state DMV investigates your appeal. You will be informed in writing when the investigation is completed and will receive the results of the investigation. If your appeal is successful and there truly were incorrect items on your driving history report, they will be removed.

Tips & Warnings

  • Remember that every state's DMV is required to remove any inaccurate items from your driving history report. The DMV must also remove any items that have gone past the statute of limitations. Statue of limitations vary from state to state, but the typical statute of limitation for accidents, speeding tickets, and other minor infractions is around three years, while 10 years is the norm for more serious violations like DUI's.
  • If your state DMV denies your appeal and you truly do have incorrect items on your driving history report, you can bring a copy of the letter you sent the DMV, along with the results of their investigation, to a traffic law attorney. The attorney will plead your case for you by filing a motion with the court to force the DMV to remove the erroneous items. Using an attorney can be expensive, however, so make sure you really need those incorrect items removed from your driving history report before hiring one.
  • You are entitled to a copy of your driving history report, no matter what state you call home. Laws regarding how to obtain the report vary from state to state, and most states charge a fee for the report. Your local DMV office can tell you the procedure for getting the report in your state and how much it will cost.
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References

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  • Photo Credit The girl operates the automobile image by YURY MARYUNIN from Fotolia.com

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