How to Stop a Redwing Blackbird Attack

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Redwing blackbirds are common birds found in major cities, rural areas and everywhere in between in the United States. The males of this species have red patches on their wings, and the female of this species are normally a streaky brown. They prefer marshy areas to dry ones, and after the eggs are laid, the males become extremely aggressive, even attacking people, animals and objects they feel compromise the safety of their eggs or young chicks.

  • Avoid areas with high populations of redwing blackbirds; that is, usually near a water source. Absence in this case is always the best policy. Typically the blackbirds are more aggressive during the mating and breeding seasons, which lasts from late spring to early autumn. The nesting period for redwing blackbirds is 11 to 14 days after the babies are born. The incubation period is 11 to 13 days. Male redwing blackbirds are very territorial, many times have several nesting females inside of their territory. The nests are built low in trees or marsh grasses.

  • Duck as low as possible right before the redwing attacks so that the bird misses you. You must time this right to avoid being hit.

  • Run as fast as possible for cover. Enter a building or get as far away as quickly as possible from the redwing. The redwings will typically swoop down and grab at your body with his feet, then wait a minute or two and repeat the action. They will continue to attack until you are away from their territory, an average of 2,000 square meters per male. How far he chases you depends on where you are in the redwing's territory.

  • Never hit or try to harm redwing blackbirds. They are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. If you purposefully harm a redwing blackbird, you can be charged large fees, up to $250,000, and face possible jail time.

References

  • Photo Credit Redwing Blackbird image by Diana Jex from Fotolia.com
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