How to Build a Massage Chair

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Enjoy a stress-relieving massage in the comfort of your own home. According to Living Life Abundantly, stress is on the rise, mainly due to the economic crisis. Frequent massages can help reduce the level of stress. If you can't afford a professional masseuse, a massage chair will suffice. However, you don't have to go out and buy an expensive leather massage chair. Believe it or not, you can make your own with tennis balls and a little creativity.

Things You'll Need

  • Measuring tape
  • 1950s dining chair frame
  • 1 big piece of plywood
  • Saw
  • 50 tennis balls
  • Pencil
  • Jigsaw
  • Golf ball
  • Marker
  • Power drill
  • 8 nuts and bolts
  • Measure the length and width of the seat and back support of the dining chair frame to determine how big your pieces of plywood need to be. Use a saw to cut the big piece of plywood into four parts, two the size of the seat support frame and two the size of the back support frame.

  • Determine how many rows of tennis balls your seat can comfortably fit. The seat and the back will each have either four rows of four tennis balls, or five rows of five balls. For example, if your plywood can hold five rows of five balls, then you will need 25 balls for the seat and 25 for the back for a total of 50 balls.

  • Use a tennis ball to trace your rows and columns of circles on to one piece of the seat plywood and one piece of the back plywood. Use a jigsaw to cut out the traced circles.

  • Use the golf ball to trace a set of smaller circles on the remaining two pieces of plywood. These plywood pieces will serve as the back piece to the plywood pieces with tennis-ball sized holes. Use the jigsaw to cut the traced golf ball circles. The smaller holes are to ensure that the tennis ball will not push through the large holes, but will allow the balls to roll within the holes.

  • Line up the piece with large holes that fits the back support of the chair frame. Use the existing holes in the chair frame to determine where you will drill holes to attach the plywood to the frame. Use a marker to mark spots on the wood that correspond to the holes on the chair frame. Power drill holes into the marked spots big enough to fit bolts. Repeat the step with the plywood containing the smaller holes. Follow the same steps for the two pieces of plywood for the seat support of the chair frame, using the existing holes in the seat of the frame for the bolt holes.

  • Attach the plywood with the big holes to the front side of the back support of the chair using bolts. The bolts should be long enough to go through two pieces of plywood and the chair frame with room to spare for a nut. Once the bolts are through the large-hole plywood and chair frame, attach the plywood with the small holes to the back of the chair frame and secure the bolts with nuts. Repeat this procedure for the seat support portion of the chair, making sure the plywood piece with big holes is the top piece.

  • Place tennis balls in all the large holes. Roll your back and bottom around on the balls to enjoy your self-made massage chair.

References

  • Photo Credit ballyscanlon/Stockbyte/Getty Images
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