How to Grow Herbs in Water

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Herbs that grow in water include the large family of watercress and mint. Watercress is a hardy perennial that grows naturally in wet soil and in springs, brooks, ditches and pond margins. Growing mint indoors in water means handy herbs for teas, infusions and garnishes for drinks and food. Watercress is valued for its vitamins and minerals as well as the many health properties it imparts. Mints have been used for centuries to make jellies, soothing bath oils and perfumes. Lemon balm or mint is often used to decorate cakes or garnish iced teas.

Things You'll Need

  • Varieties of watercress
  • Varieties of mint
  • Natural brook, stream or manmade pond
  • Vases
  • Two dozen flat, smooth stones, or more as needed
  • Sugar
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Choose healthy plants to add to your water feature or to grow indoors in vases. Purchase watercress at plant nurseries or divide the roots of natural plants growing in creeks or springs near you. Buy mint plants from nurseries or local stores.

  • Secure your plants, the watercress or loosestrife, at the edge of your water feature (washtub, creek, pond or spring). The roots should touch the bottom; only the top of the plant needs to be above water. Anchor the cress and loosestrife by placing a small stone on one root of each plant.

  • Moving water is needed to prevent the growth of bacteria and algae. Harvest the tops, leaves or seeds from the plants, but do not uproot them. Harvesting encourages the herb to produce more leaves, seeds or flowers.

  • Place mint plants in a vase of cool, clean water. Give your mints up to six hours of morning sunlight. Change the water every day to prevent the growth of bacteria. Pinch off leaves as needed for cooking or garnishing.

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  • Photo Credit cressonnette_0047 image by Hubert Isselée from Fotolia.com ginger mint image by hazel proudlove from Fotolia.com growing lettuce image by joanna wnuk from Fotolia.com amarantine flower of loosestrife image by Maria Brzostowska from Fotolia.com cheese cake image by Kathy Burns from Fotolia.com
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