How to Install a Turbo 350 Transmission Filter

Save

General Motors introduced the Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 transmission in 1969, featuring three forward gears and one reverse gear. The fully automatic transmission consists primarily of a torque converter and a planetary gear set, as well as a number of clutches, bands and seals. To keep these components lubricated and cool, the transmission relies on fluid. The fluid passes through a filter at the bottom of the transmission, which removes any metal deposits.

Things You'll Need

  • Wrench
  • Oil catch pan
  • Flathead screwdriver
  • Gasket scraper
  • Silicone sealant
  • 6 qt. Dexron or Dexron II transmission fluid
  • Park the vehicle on a level surface and allow it to cool at least 2 hours to avoid being burned by hot transmission fluid.

  • Remove the 13 bolts that secure the transmission pan to the bottom of the transmission with a wrench.

  • Position an oil catch pan underneath the transmission pan, then wedge a flathead screwdriver between one side of the transmission pan and the bottom of the transmission. Twist the screwdriver to detach the pan from the transmission.

  • Remove the bolts that secure the transmission filter to the bottom of the transmission with a wrench, then lower the filter out of the transmission.

  • Position the replacement transmission filter against the bottom of the transmission, ensuring that that holes within the filter housing align with the holes in the transmission, then install and tighten the filter’s bolts with a wrench.

  • Clean the edge of the transmission pan and the bottom of the transmission of all gasket material with a gasket scraper.

  • Spread silicone sealant across both sides of a new pan gasket, then place the gasket onto the pan.

  • Position the pan against the bottom of the transmission and install the pan’s securing bolts with a wrench.

  • Fill the transmission with approximately 5 1/2 qt. of Dexron or Dexron II type transmission fluid through the dipstick tube, or until the fluid reaches the “Full” mark stamped on the dipstick.

References

  • “Motor's Auto Repair Manual”; Louis C. Forier; 1969
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

How To Travel For Free With Reward Points

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!