How to Give a Quitclaim Deed to My Son

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A Quitclaim deed is an easy way to transfer real property from one party to another. Quitclaims are often filed by family members in order to transfer a home to a relative or add someone's name in addition to the original owner. There are many legal considerations to transfer of property which are not addressed in a quitclaim deed. They are intended only for the most basic transfers of property.

Things You'll Need

  • Original deed to the property
  • Quitclaim deed form
  • Determine if a quitclaim deed is the appropriate way to transfer your property. You may want to consult with an attorney or a real estate agent to ensure you are going about the transfer in the best way.

  • Locate a copy of a quitclaim form that is appropriate for your state. Many public libraries and some courthouses have forms available.

  • Discuss with your son any dollar amount that you will expect for the transfer of your property to him. Decide if you want to transfer the property completely to him or if you just want to add his name with yours.

  • Locate a copy of the original deed to your property. You will need the information from this document in order to correctly fill out the quitclaim deed. You should be able to get a copy from the local recorder or clerk's office.

  • Complete the information on the quitclaim form with you as the grantor. Fill in the legal description of the property and other information exactly as it shows on your original deed. Add your son's (and yours for both names) in the grantee section.

  • Sign the form in the presence of a notary public. This ensures that the signature is valid and legal. Notaries public are available in most banks and many courthouses.

  • Make at least three copies of the document so each party has a copy. File the deed in the appropriate office, most likely the recorder's office. Check with the local clerk to ensure correct filing.

Tips & Warnings

  • It is best to make legal decisions after consultation with an attorney. Mistakes are common, and a quitclaim deed may not be the right choice for your situation.

References

  • Photo Credit Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images
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