How to Find Out My Student Loan Balance

Save

Financial institutions that service student loans send out monthly statements to the borrowers indicating when the next payment is due and what the current balances are. Referencing your last monthly statement would be one way to get a current balance, but if you could not find it, then simply calling the servicing lender and speaking with a representative will give you the information you seek. The instructions will help you locate the lender’s information and then obtain your exact student loan balance.

Things You'll Need

  • Internet connection (optional)
  • PIN (number issued when you applied for financial aid)
  • Pen
  • Paper

Finding a Student Loan Balance

  • Call the National Student Loan Data System or log onto their website at nslds.ed.gov. You’ll need to provide to the representative or type in your Social Security number, first two letters of your last name, date of birth and your PIN. If you’re on the Internet, then click “Submit.”

  • Write down the lender information of the institution that is servicing the loan in question.

  • Call the lender and follow the prompts to speak to a representative. Ask the representative to give you a current balance.

  • Write down the current balance with pen and paper. Ask the representative for your account number, proper mailing address and your due date every month.

Tips & Warnings

  • Paying extra towards the balance of your student loans can reduce the amount of interest that accrues on the balance and reduce the overall amount you will end up paying back. Always contact your lending institution to get the exact balance of your loan, as the balance can change daily with interest constantly accruing.
  • Keep in mind the actual balance of your loan will be more than you originally borrowed, since student loans accrue interest even during any applicable grace periods, deferments or forbearances. When asking for a “10-day payoff” quote from a lending institution, you may be quoted a balance higher than you anticipated. This is to account for accrued interest up until a certain date while waiting for your final payment to be posted. Therefore, the current balance listed on your monthly statement is not the same as an actual payoff balance.

References

  • Photo Credit Creatas/Creatas/Getty Images
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

Can You Take Advantage Of Student Loan Forgiveness?

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!