How to Create Game Shows for Training

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Corporate training helps employees learn about important company policies and improve their job performance. For some employees, classroom-style learning may be considered tedious. Game show learning formats offer variety, and the element of competition can energize and engage learners.

Things You'll Need

  • Computer
  • Microsoft PowerPoint software or presentation equivalent
  • Five learning categories
  • Twenty-five questions
  • Pen
  • Notepad
  • White board or projection screen area
  • Computer projector
  • Stopwatch or timer
  • Team-based prizes or giveaways

Create a Game Show Template

  • Using "Jeopardy" as your game show format, open Microsoft PowerPoint. Create a new, blank template and save it.

  • In the header field, insert the name of your game and a company logo or graphic. Slide one will be your game board.

  • Create a large table beneath the header. Your table should include five columns and six rows.

  • In the first row of each column, type a category name (Example: "Safety"). Base each category on specific areas covered in training.

  • For each category, enter points in each empty box in the row. Begin with 10 points and end with 50 points. Save the template.

Create Question Content for the Game

  • Insert 25 new slides in your template. Each slide will represent one question on the game board.

  • Write five questions per category. Phrase questions so competitors answer in the form of a question. (Sample question: "In the laboratory, these items are worn to protect eyes." Sample answer: "What are goggles?")

  • In slide two, create a text box in the center of the slide and write your first question. Create another text box in the lower left corner and enter the word "back." Highlight "back," then click the "insert hyperlink" icon on the PowerPoint toolbar to make a hyperlink back to the game board. Select "place in this document," and select slide one (your game board) as the link destination. Repeat for each question.

  • Return to the game board slide and highlight the text in the first point level for the first category. Click the "insert hyperlink" icon on the PowerPoint toolbar and link text to the second slide by clicking "place in this document," and selecting slide two. Repeat for each point level and question slide.

  • Ensure all links work on the game board and question slides.

Playing the Game

  • Break your class into teams of two or three depending on class size. Have each team select a captain.

  • Connect your computer to the projector. Adjust the projector for the white board or flat surface you are using to present. Select "slide show" on the PowerPoint toolbar and begin the game.

  • Have the first team select a category and point level. Give the team 90 seconds to answer. If the team answers correctly, award points. Keep scores on your notepad. If the team answers incorrectly, subtract points and let another team answer the question to gain points.

  • Click "back" to return to the game board. Give the next team a choice of question category and level.

  • Play until all questions on the screen are answered. Tally all points for each team. Award each member of the winning team a prize.

Tips & Warnings

  • Know the number of class participants before acquiring prizes and be sure you have enough prizes to reward each team member.
  • Select generic prizes such as gift cards for movies, bookstores or restaurants.
  • Use questions of varying levels of difficulty to keep the game challenging for participants. Let teams choose their own team leaders and ensure all answers or questions are selected by leaders.
  • Avoid writing questions that are ambiguous or that could have various answers.
  • Photo Credit John Rowley/Digital Vision/Getty Images
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