How to Be a Company Representative

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Being a company representative isn't just pinning your name tag to your shirt and clocking in for your shift. It's much deeper and speaks to your level of commitment and loyalty to your employer. Aspiring to be a company representative involves advancing your career, improving your engagement level and reaping the rewards of job satisfaction. Regardless of whether they're the leaders or rank-and-file, company representatives are the employees who are genuinely interested in achieving their employers' organizational goals.

  • Study the organization's mission and vision for success. If you work for -- or want to work for -- a large organization, the company's mission statement likely is expressed in the employee handbook, on its website or in promotional materials and brochures. Embracing the organization's core values and principles are fundamental to becoming a company representative, no matter your field, position or industry.

  • Ask your manager or even your colleagues and peers what it takes to exceed your employer's expectations and how to be successful in your role. Company representatives typically are leaders or high-performing staff who are fully engaged workers. Demonstrating your full capabilities and aptitude can put you at the top of the list of valued employees, and thus, a dedicated company representative. Doing your best work also will convey the message to your co-workers that you enjoy contributing to the company's success. Recognition by your peers is just as important as recognition by supervisors and managers.

  • Pay attention to your industry standards, best practices and ways to improve your knowledge base. For example, if you're the human resources manager for a hospital, stay abreast of changes in health care administration. Apply your expertise at every opportunity to showcase your employer's commitment to providing exceptional health care. Likewise, if you're in retail sales for a home-improvement chain, understand your store's products and use your knowledge to explain to customers the advantage of buying from your store instead of the competitor.

  • Carry your business cards, don the polo shirt with your company's logo and follow your employer's site on LinkedIn as a way of saying, "I'm proud of being on this team." When people ask what you do for a living, don't simply give your job title or reluctantly say something like, "I work in a manufacturing plant." Enthusiastically tell others what your job entails -- within reason, of course. You needn't give a run-down of your daily tasks, but explain who you work for and why your job is important.

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  • Photo Credit XiXinXing/XiXinXing/Getty Images
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