How to Calculate Calories Burned in a 10K

Save

Participating in a 10k race (6.2 miles) can be accomplished through self-determination and by following a training schedule leading up to the day of the race. Many runners participate in a 10k to support and raise money for a charity or for a sense of accomplishment, while others are motivated to burn calories to help lose weight. The amount of calories burned during a 10k is different for everyone; the final tally depends on a person's weight and the speed at which they run, jog or walk.

Things You'll Need

  • Stop watch
  • Pedometer (optional)
  • Calculator
  • Doctor
  • Personal trainer (optional)
  • Decide whether your 10k will be done by walking, jogging, running or sprinting. The pace at which you decide to run may range from a 6-minute mile sprint to a 14-minute mile walk. Remember that the harder you work, the more calories you will expend. Runners World Magazine (runnersworld.com) estimates that a 150-pound runner who increases his pace from an 8.5 minute mile to a seven minute mile will burn approximately 180 calories more per hour.

  • Determine how long it takes you to run one mile. You can easily do this while you are training for the race day, as training involves runs which vary in mileage. Run three miles (which is approximately half of a 10k). You can determine the mileage you covered by using a pedometer or by visiting the web site www.mapmyrun.com .

  • Record the minutes it takes you to complete the three mile run on a stop watch.

  • Visit an online calorie calculator to determine how many calories you will burn per mile, depending on your rate of speed during the race. Visit this site: http://www.changingshape.com/resources/calculators/caloriesburnedcalculator.asp .

  • Enter your weight in pounds in the box marked "weight." Select the closest option to your individual mile per minute average under the running option. You can find this number by taking the number of minutes it took you to run three miles and dividing it by 3.

  • In the box marked "duration," enter the number of minutes it took you to run the three miles and hit "submit."

  • The number of calories you burned by running 3 miles will appear on the next screen. Multiply this number by 2 to determine the approximate number of calories you will burn by running your 10k.

Tips & Warnings

  • It may be helpful to talk with someone who is an experienced runner and has completed similar races in the past. She can give you helpful tips and advice before the big day.
  • To prevent an injury, do not attempt to run a 10k if you're not an experienced runner. Running 6.2 miles may be harder than you think.

References

Promoted By Zergnet

You May Also Like

  • Calories Burned While Rollerblading

    Rollerblading, or inline skating, is a great exercise it's physically challenging but also fun. An intense workout on your rollerblades can burn...

  • How Many Calories are Burned by Jogging 4 Miles?

    Many casual joggers pound the pavement to burn pesky calories, but calculating the burn for specific distances can be difficult without high-tech...

  • How to Train to Run a 10K Race

    The 10K (10 kilometers, or 6.2 miles) is a road-running standard. Even if you're a beginning runner, you've likely heard of the...

  • How to Prepare for a 10K Race

    When preparing for a 10K race, begin training four to six months out from the race, work out four days of the...

  • How Many Calories Do You Burn When I Run?

    The number of calories burned while running depends on the environmental conditions, the physical fitness of the runner and the distance and...

  • How Do You Take Creatine?

    Creatine is taken in phases, as the first phase consists of loading the system, and the doses are gradually reduced over the...

  • What Powers Treadmills?

    Modern treadmills are powered by electricity, which operates a motor that runs the conveyor belt. Understand how a treadmill works with tips...

Related Searches

Check It Out

10 Delicious Game Day Eats That Rival the Game

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!