How to Make a Capiz Shell Chandelier

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Capiz shell chandeliers add grace and style to any home décor. You can make any size capiz shell chandelier that you like with capiz shell beads and monofilament line. Capiz are mollusks that are native to the Philippines and which have beautiful translucent shells resembling mother of pearl. You can find capiz shell beads at online bead retailers and possibly at your local craft store.

Things You'll Need

  • Installed single bulb light fixture
  • 12-inch metal craft circle
  • Pencil
  • Stud finder
  • 4 small ceiling hooks
  • Monofilament line
  • Scissors
  • 2-inch round capiz shell beads
  • Clear craft glue
  • Assemble the materials for the capiz shell chandelier. You can find capiz shell beads sold in packages of 100 at online bead retailers. Capiz shell beads have pre-drilled holes and come in a variety of shapes and colors, so you can get creative with your chandelier. Craft circles, monofilament line and ceiling hooks can be found at your local discount or craft store.

  • Hold the metal craft circle against the ceiling around an installed single bulb light fixture. Trace the circle with a light pencil. With your stud finder, locate at least one ceiling joist on the perimeter of the circle. Mark the spot. This is enough to hold the weight of the capiz shell chandelier, but you need to also mark spots for three more hooks so your chandelier will hang evenly. The four hooks should be evenly spaced at quarter intervals around the circle.

  • Attach the hooks to the ceiling and hang the craft circle to check the fit. The circle should hang evenly. Remove the circle.

  • Cut 16 strands of monofilament line measuring 4 feet long each. Each of the strands of your chandelier will only hang 24 inches long; the extra line is for making the knots.

  • Make double overhand knot 12 inches from one end of one strand of monofilament line. Thread one capiz shell onto the strand until it reaches the knot. Make another double knot 1-inch above the top of the capiz shell. Thread another shell to the last knot you made. Measure 1 inch from the top of the shell and make another double overhand knot. Thread another capiz shell to the knot. Continue making knots and threading shells until there are 12 capiz shells on the strand. Repeat this step 15 times.

    Tie each of the strands onto the craft circle with a triple overhand knot. Space the strands evenly around the circle. Add a drop of craft glue to each knot for added security and to help the strand stay in place on the craft ring. Hang your capiz shell chandelier onto the ceiling hooks.

  • Make double overhand knot 12 inches from one end of one strand of monofilament line. Thread one capiz shell onto the strand until it reaches the knot. Make another double knot 1-inch above the top of the capiz shell. Thread another shell to the last knot you made. Measure 1 inch from the top of the shell and make another double overhand knot. Thread another capiz shell to the knot. Continue making knots and threading shells until there are 12 capiz shells on the strand. Repeat this step 15 times.

    Tie each of the strands onto the craft circle with a triple overhand knot. Space the strands evenly around the circle. Add a drop of craft glue to each knot for added security and to help the strand stay in place on the craft ring. Hang your capiz shell chandelier onto the ceiling hooks.

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