How to Increase Heat From a Wood Burning Fireplace


While many homeowners enjoy sitting in the glow of a wood burning fireplace and listening to the crackling sounds that only a wood burning fireplace can offer, some would agree that most of the energy and heat produced by a wood burning fireplace is passed directly through the flue and up the chimney. As a result, the wood burning fireplace provides little heat to the room in which it is situated. A solution can be easily implemented to improve the efficiency of the fireplace and provide more direct heat to the adjoining room.

Things You'll Need

  • 1 tape measure
  • 1 Heatilator Fireplace Blower Kit
  • Remove existing andirons from the fireplace, and thoroughly clean the firebox until it is free of ashes.

  • Use a tape measure to measure the width of the firebox at its narrowest point. Measure the depth of the firebox from front to rear.

  • Purchase one Heatilator Firebox Blower kit from a home supply that best fits your firebox length and width measurements.

  • Install the Heatilator Firebox Blower Kit. Center it in the firebox, and plug the blower electrical cord into the nearest electrical outlet.

  • Position the wood to be burned on the firebox insert of the heatilator. The firebox insert replaces and serves the same purpose as andirons.

  • Start the fire in the fireplace as usual. Once the fire is fully burning turn on the Firebox Blower fan switch to extract the heated air from the hollow pipes of the firebox insert, and blow hot air into the adjoining room.

Tips & Warnings

  • Heatilator systems may be found at home supply and fireplace supply stores. These also are available on line. (See resource guide below.) Heatilators may be used in conjunction with glass door fireplace enclosures.
  • Heatilator blowers use a regular household current, but do require an outlet with a grounding plug.


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