How to Increase Your Iron Level For Plasma Donation

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In order to be eligible for plasma donation, your iron level needs to be within the acceptable range. Having a low iron level will defer you from plasma donation. There are things you can do to help raise your iron level so you can have a successful plasma donation.

  • Find out how much iron you get each day. It is estimated that over 60% of women do not get enough iron. Read food labels and make it your goal to get at least 18 milligrams of iron per day, which is the recommended amount. If labels mention iron in percentages, add them up until you have 100%. Avoid drinking coffee, tea or milk when eating foods high in iron, as they slow down the absorption of iron. Vitamin C will help the iron absorb better, so consider a glass oF fruit juice or eating Vitamin C foods along with the foods high in iron.

  • Choose cereals high in iron, such as shredded wheat, Cheerios, Life, or Total, to name a few. Total has 18 mg. of iron, a big help towards increasing your iron level for plasma donation!

  • Eat dark green vegetables, such as spinach, broccoli or swiss chard. Add nuts, beans, raisins, prunes, or apricots to your diet.

  • Add tuna, oysters and other types of fish to your diet. These are also excellent choices to bring your iron level up to an acceptable range for plasma donation.

  • Consume lean red meat, beef or liver. Ground beef has 3.9 mg. of iron and liver (not surprising) is an excellent source of iron with 7.5 mg.

  • Consider a multi-vitamin with 100% of daily iron. As people get older they may not absorb iron as well. Adding an iron pill is a good option if you find eating iron packed foods do not seem to raise your iron level much. Be sure to take vitamins with food, otherwise they may cause an upset stomach.

Tips & Warnings

  • With such a variety of iron packed foods, it should be easy to find something that you
  • can add to help increase your iron levels, improve your health and lead to
  • successful plasma donation!
  • Check food labels for the amount of iron in each food. Different brands of the same
  • food may have different levels of iron.
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