How to Eat a Kiwano Horned Melon

Save

Kiwano horned melons grow in New Zealand and even some parts of California. Originally from Africa, this unique-looking melon is orange at peak ripeness and covered with spiky protrusions. You can keep a kiwano melon for about 2 months, so it makes an ideal decoration for a table centerpiece. The kiwano melon's flavor compares to that of a cucumber, with edible seeds and a jelly-like center.

  • Make sure your kiwano horned melon is ripe. Look for a golden orange color with no bruises or cuts in the rind.

  • Cut open your kiwano melon either vertically or horizontally. Use a spoon to scoop out and eat the gelatinous center and the seeds.

  • Slice your melon lengthwise into strips. Pick up a slice and eat it like you eat cantaloupe with the rind still attached to the edible insides.

  • Use your Kiwano melon like a dish. Cut the melon in half and scoop out the edible portions of both halves to form two bowls. Add ice cream to each half and top it with the melon seeds and jelly.

  • Mix your kiwano melon with pineapple and banana in a recipe for sorbet from the FatFree Vegan Kitchen website. You can serve the sorbet in the hollowed shell of your kiwano.

Tips & Warnings

  • You can add some sugar to your kiwano melon before you eat it.
  • Kiwano horned melons are available all year round.
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

Resources

You May Also Like

  • How to Cut a Star Fruit

    Star fruit, typically grown in Thailand and parts of Southeast Asia, Australia, South America, Hawaii and Florida, is available in the winter...

  • How to Make Melon Ice Cream

    Take advantage of all the summer has to offer. Sweet, succulent melon together with rich milk in a frozen dessert will please...

  • How to Eat a Pepino Melon

    Technically not a melon, the sweet, mild-flavored pepino is a member of the nightshade plant family, related to the tomato, potato and...

  • Melon Vine Identification

    Melons are members of the Cucurbitaceae family, a botanical clan also including cucumbers, squashes, pumpkins and gourds. Unlike their cousin cucurbits, melons...

Related Searches

Check It Out

13 Delicious Thanksgiving Sides That'll Make Turkey Insignificant

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!