How to Repair a Broken Kenmore Refrigerator Water Dispenser Hose

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A simple system of tubes delivers water to the dispenser on the front of your Kenmore refrigerator. When you press the water dispenser lever, a solenoid on the back of the refrigerator opens, allowing water to flow through the hose and into your glass. If the tube leaks or is broken, you can replace it with tubing of the same size. Basic tools are all you need to repair a broken water dispenser hose on your Kenmore refrigerator.

Things You'll Need

  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Pliers
  • Shallow pan
  • Flat-head screwdriver
  • Plastic tubing
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Unplug the refrigerator to prevent accidental activation of the water dispenser while you replace the hose.

  • Remove the two Phillips-head screws that secure the grille to the base of the refrigerator. The screws are located on each end of the grille, below the refrigerator and freezer doors. Pull the grille off to access the water dispenser hose connection.

  • Place a shallow pan under the water dispenser connection near the lower hinge of the refrigerator door. Hold the filter-side of the nut with one pair of pliers and turn the other side of the nut counterclockwise with another pair of pliers. Unscrew the nut and pull the dispenser side of the hose out of the connection. Catch any dripping water in the shallow pan. Slide the ferrule and nut off the dispenser hose and set them aside. Slide the hose back through the cable tie that secures it to the lower hinge.

  • Pull the drip tray out of the dispenser housing. Hold the drip tray flat against the front of the refrigerator, just below the bottom of the dispenser. Slide the blade of a flat-head screwdriver into one of the slots in the bottom of the dispenser frame. Place the drip tray under the blade of the screwdriver and pry out on the dispenser frame, using the drip tray as a fulcrum. Repeat this process with the slot on the other side of the dispenser frame. Unplug the switch connector on the back of the dispenser frame and remove the frame from the refrigerator.

  • Unplug the three connectors inside the dispenser panel. Remove the two screws holding the panel in place with a flat-head screwdriver. Pull the panel out of the front of the refrigerator. Pull the dispenser tube and bracket out of the hole behind the panel. Slide the bracket off the dispenser tube.

  • Tape the end of a replacement tube to the end of the broken tube. Have an assistant feed the new tubing down through the refrigerator door while you pull the old tubing out from the bottom. Continue pulling the tubing until you have enough new tubing extending out of the bottom of the door to run through the cable tie and reach the dispenser connection. Remove the tape and discard the old tubing.

  • Feed the new tubing through the cable tie and route it to the dispenser connection. Slide the nut onto the end of the new tubing, followed by the ferrule. Insert the end of the tubing into the dispenser connection and tighten the nut securely with pliers. Remove the shallow pan. Place the grille on the front of the refrigerator and install the two Phillips-head retaining screws.

  • Slide the other end of the new tubing through the tube bracket. Cut the tubing with scissors, leaving approximately 1 inch of tubing extending from the bracket. Insert the bracket and tubing into the hole behind the panel.

  • Place the panel in the front of the refrigerator. Install and tighten the two flat-head screws. Connect the three wiring plugs in the panel. Connect the switch connector to the back of the dispenser frame. Place the frame over the dispenser housing and press it until it snaps into place. Place the drip tray in the dispenser.

  • Plug in the refrigerator.

Tips & Warnings

  • Replacement tubing is available at most home improvement stores.
  • Cut a short piece off the old tubing to take with you to the store to make sure you get the same size replacement tubing. This will leave you with enough tubing to feed the new tubing through the door.
  • Don’t bend or kink the replacement hose. This causes cracks that will leak over time.

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References

  • Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images
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