Removing Sulfur with an Aerator Tank

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An aerator system is a large holding tank that sits outside of a home and connects to its water supply to neutralize sulfur in the water. Sometimes sulfur still can build up within the aerator tank, and the homeowner may notice a rotten egg odor in the water supply. Removing the sulfur from the aerator includes thoroughly cleaning the tank and taking other precautions that will help to prevent excessive amounts of sulfur.

Things You'll Need

  • 1 1/2 cup regular, non-scented bleach
  • High-pressure hose
  • Basket
  • Unstabilized chlorine tablets safe for bath and drinking water
  • 2 adjustable wrenches
  • Latex gloves
  • Non-scented household bleach
  • Sponge

Non-Draining Methods

  • Add 1/2 cup of regular, non-scented bleach to your home’s salt tank. Add that amount of the bleach once every week to improve your home’s water supply and to remove the sulfur.

  • Spray water from a high-pressure hose into the aerator. Smell the water in your home to test it.

  • Install a basket in the aerator, and place one unstabilized chlorine tablet that is safe for bath and drinking water in the basket. The chlorine will help to reduce sulfur buildup.

Draining Method

  • Unplug the house pump power cord from its electrical outlet. Disconnect the electrical power to the aerator by switching off your home’s main circuit breaker.

  • Connect one adjustable wrench to the drainpipe in the aerator, and connect another adjustable wrench to the drain cap. Turn both wrenches clockwise to remove the entire drain plug from the aerator.

  • Put on latex gloves. Remove the lid from the aerator tank, and pour 1/2 gallon of non-scented household bleach into the aerator. Scrub the insides and all portions of the aerator and tank using a sponge while wearing the gloves.

  • Turn on the electric power supply after all the water drains from the aerator tank. Put the lid back on the tank. Allow the spray in the aerator to rinse the aerator and tank for a least 30 seconds.

  • Reconnect the drain plug to the aerator, and plug the house pump back into its electrical outlet. Either install a basket in the aerator and place one unstabilized chlorine tablet that is safe for bath and drinking water in the basket, or add 1 cup of non-scented household bleach to the aerator.

Tips & Warnings

  • To determine whether or not your home's aerator tank contains too much sulfur, run water in your home, such as from a kitchen faucet, and smell the water. If it has a rotten egg type odor, then too much sulfur is in the aerator tank.
  • Baskets for aerators are available at home improvement stores and from online retailers.

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