How to Rewind a Stator

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Designed to function as the charging unit in small engine applications, such as snowmobiles, motorcycles, ATVs and personal water crafts, stators operate similarly to an automobile alternator. Stators produce electrical current by spinning coils of copper wire, wound around individual heads, through a series of brushes. If any of the individual wire coils become damaged, most commonly from overheating, the damaged stator heads must be rewound with new wire.

Things You'll Need

  • Utility knife
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Fine-grade steel wool
  • Cloth
  • Copper wire
  • New terminal leads
  • Multimeter
  • Liquid rubber
  • Examine each individual coil head on the stator for black marks, indicating burned wires. Carefully cut the protective rubber coating from each damaged coil with a utility knife.

  • Study the direction the wire is wrapped around the coil head to determine if the top or bottom end of the wire is attached to positive or negative terminal clip. Remove the terminal clips from the base of the damaged coil heads with a Phillips screwdriver.

  • Unwind the damaged wire from the stator head with your fingers. Clean the surface of the head with a piece of fine-grade steel wool and wipe the head clean with a lint-free cloth.

  • Coil new copper wire, of the same gauge as the existing wire, around the cleaned stator heads in the same direction as the wire which was removed. Coil the wire tightly on the heads so there are no spaces or gaps between the wire wrappings, leaving 1-inch lengths of wire at the top and bottom of each head for attaching new terminal leads.

  • Crimp new terminal leads to the ends of the new copper wire with a pair of pliers. Attach the terminal leads to the stator with the Phillips screwdriver.

  • Set a multimeter to the DC “1X” or “ohm” setting. Touch the black meter probe to either of the main leads of the stator and then touch the red meter probe to the remaining main lead of the stator. Any reading on the meter confirms continuity of the wires, indicating the stator is functioning properly. If there is no reading on the meter, recheck the connections.

  • Coat the new wire with liquid rubber and allow the rubber to set according to the product directions.

Tips & Warnings

  • To help with installation of the new wire, draw a diagram on a piece of paper or take a photo with a digital camera before removing the damaged wire from the stator heads.

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References

  • The Essential Guide to Motorcycle Maintenance; Mark Zimmerman
  • Yamaha; Water Vehicles Shop Manual 1993-1996; Randy Stephens
  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images
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