Care for a Succulent Dish Garden

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Succulent plants have thick, fleshy leaves that store water. Their water storage capabilities make them well suited to a low-maintenance indoor garden since they require minimal irrigation and care to thrive. Succulents come in many varieties with different leaf shapes and colors. Some types produce attractive flowers while others are primarily grown for their foliage. Planting small varieties, such as crassula or echeveria, in a small dish garden allows you to enjoy several of these attractive plants in a small space.

Things You'll Need

  • Soluble fertilizer
  • Place the dish garden in an area that receives bright but indirect sunlight. A location near a sunny south-facing window supplies enough light, as does a location with filtered light through a sheer curtain. Direct sunlight can burn and damage the succulent leaves.

  • Select a location away from cold drafts, such as near open windows, doors or air conditioner vents. Constant cold air damages the succulent plants.

  • Water the plants when the soil in the dish dries out completely. Provide enough water to moisten the soil but avoid standing water. Most dish gardens don't have drainage holes so careful watering is necessary. If your dish has drainage holes, empty the water from the drip tray after irrigation.

  • Fertilize once monthly with a soluble low-nitrogen fertilizer. Apply the fertilizer at half the rate recommended on the package. Only fertilize in the spring and summer growing season and stop fertilizer treatments in fall and winter.

Tips & Warnings

  • Succulent leaves tend to become wrinkled or lose their firmness when they require water.
  • Leaf drop or death, or soft, spongy stems, indicate rot caused by overwatering. Stop watering the plants until all the excess moisture in the soil dries.

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References

  • Photo Credit Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images
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