Water pH & Pollution

Save

One of the most devastating side effects of pollution is increased acidity in rain and groundwater. This affects animals and plants, and has long-term implications for our environment.

The pH Scale

  • The pH scale measures the acidity or alkalinity of a liquid, from 0 to 14---7 is neutral, anything below 7 is acidic and anything higher is alkaline.

Natural Water

  • Rain and groundwater tend to be naturally slightly acidic, usually no lower than 6 on the pH scale. Most plants and animals tolerate this level of acidity without any problems.

Pollution

  • Byproducts of air and water pollution are acidic. While natural alkaline substances in the soil can reduce their impact, the result of such pollution is often a much more acidic environment than normal.

Acid Rain

  • When low-pH water spreads via precipitation, it is called acid rain. As it soaks into the ground and collects in streams, it can drastically change the ecosystem.

Consequences

  • As pH drops, more fragile plants and animals may become sick and die. In addition, a pH change in a body of water can affect the microorganisms living within, with domino effects that can destroy the entire aquatic food chain.

References

  • Photo Credit Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Sam
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

How to Build and Grow a Salad Garden On Your Balcony

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!