Is There a Recommended Daily Intake for Omega 3 & 6?

  • Print this article
Nuts can provide a vegan source of fatty acids.
Nuts can provide a vegan source of fatty acids.

Both omega-3 and omega-6 are polyunsaturated fatty acids essential to the human body. The ratio of these two fatty acids proves fundamental to their health benefits.

  1. Function

    • Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids have opposing functions; yet, both improve health in the appropriate balance. Omega-6 fatty acids increase blood pressure and inflammatory reactions while omega-3 fatty acids oppose these reactions.

    Types

    • Eggs are a good source of omega-6 fats.
      Eggs are a good source of omega-6 fats.

      Alpha-linolenic (ALA), Dexahaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) comprise the family of omega-3 fatty acids. These fats can be found in fatty fish, canola oil, flax seeds and walnuts. Linoleic acid (LA), Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and Arachidonic acid (AA) form the omega-6 fats. Omega-6 fat sources include: soybean, corn, safflower seeds, nuts, meat, poultry and eggs.

    Significance

    • Americans consume 10 times the quantity of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. This imbalance contributes to increased inflammatory disorders in the U.S. The ideal ratio ranges between two to four times omega-6 than omega-3 fatty acids.

    The Facts

    • The Institute of Medicine (IOM) established an Adequate Intake (AI) for healthy adults at 12 to 17 g/day LA and 1.1 to 1.6 g/day ALA. American Heart Association suggests eating a variety of oily fish at least two times a week in addition to plant foods rich in ALA.

    Warning

    • Excessive intake of either fat supplement can cause harm. Omega-3 fats can contribute to prolonged bleeding and suppression of the immune system. Omega-6 fats can lead to gastrointestinal upset.

    Considerations

    • Eating a variety of food sources, as encouraged in the Mediterranean Diet, increases the likelihood of obtaining the ideal balance of fatty acids from foods.

Related Searches

References

Resources

  • Photo Credit Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Steffen Zahn Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of D. Sharon Pruitt

You May Also Like

Related Ads

Featured
View Mobile Site