Why Do My Joints Ache?

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Joint pain is caused by the erosion of cartilage, causing the bones to rub together. As the body ages, it loses its natural ability to absorb fluid. That fluid is what keeps the cartilage spongy and able to absorb the shock of movement.

Causes

Some of the more common causes of joint pain are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infectious diseases, overuse, tendinitis or bursitis. While everyday activity can cause stress on joints, these conditions can further aggravate the erosion. Another factor is loss of the synovium, a membrane that covers the ends of the bones and produces a thick fluid called synovial fluid.

Symptoms

The symptoms of joint pain can include warmth, swelling, stiffness, loss of function and redness. Not all the symptoms may be present, and there are others you could be having. Often some of these symptoms can cause others, and usually they are flu-like. These include fever, headaches, fatigue, chills and loss of appetite.

Hydration

Over 80 percent of the body is made up of fluid. When the cartilage loses its spongy quality, motion in the joints will cause it to wear away. While there are some supplements that can assist your body in absorbing what it needs from food, the best way to help your joints is to drink enough water every day.

Synovium

Synovium is a membrane that covers the ends of the bones and produces a thick fluid called synovial fluid. This fluid allows the parts of the joint to slide instead of grind. If the joint is diseased or damaged, the synovium gets inflamed and will actually invade and assist in the erosion of cartilage.

Supplements

Chondroitin, taken in addition with glucosamine, can assist the body in absorbing the necessary nutrients and fluid. Both occur naturally in the body, and when taken together have been proven by the National Institutes of Health to lessen pain.

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