Chevy 4.3 Information

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The Chevy 4.3-liter V-6 engine is a durable, compact motor used to power Chevrolet trucks, vans and some passenger cars. Although it displaces only 262 cubic inches, it is powerful enough to power full-size trucks. For more than 25 years the Chevy 4.3 filled a niche between the 5-liter V-8s and the inline four-cylinder engines. It is perhaps Chevrolet’s most popular six-cylinder engine.

Origins

  • The versatile 4.3-liter V-6 debuted in 1985 to replace the venerable 229-cubic-inch V-6 that was a mainstay for the El Camino, in which production was drawing to an end, and full-size Chevy passenger cars. The Chevy 4.3 also served to replace the 250 V-6 found in full-size trucks and vans, according to Novak-Adapt.com.

Early Version

  • The initial 4.3 featured a 4-inch bore and 3.48-inch stroke. It had the same dimensions as the 350 V-8--hence its nickname, the "three-quarter 350." Equipped with a four-barrel carburetor and a 9.3-1 compression ratio, the 1985 version of the 4.3 was capable of 155 horsepower and 230 pound-feet of torque, the twisting power generated for quick acceleration. A less powerful version generated 130 horsepower and 210 pound-feet of torque.

Improvements

  • In 1992, Chevrolet focused on minimizing vibration by placing the balance shaft on top of the top timing gear and redesigning the timing chain cover to accommodate the change. The result was a smoother running engine. Further, the compression ratio was dropped to 9.1-1. Horsepower was increased to 170 and torque to a fairly generous 260 pound-feet.

Applications

  • The Chevy 4.3-liter engine proved so popular it was placed in Chevrolet and GMC C/K trucks, Chevrolet and GMC G-Series vans, the Astro and Safari minivans, the Impala and Caprice police and taxi vehicles. The Monte Carlo, Pontiac Grand Prix, compact Chevy S-10 trucks, Chevy Blazer SUV and El Camino also were equipped with the 4.3.

Major Changes

  • The Chevy 4.3 underwent two major renovations to develop better efficiency, smoother operation and to create more horsepower. In 1996, the air-fuel mixture flow was improved thanks largely to completely redesigned heads. This brought the 4.3-liter into the Vortec engine family and was marketed as the Vortec 4300. The block was reinforced and an alloy oil pan was added for the S-10 truck, and Chevy Blazer and GMC Jimmy SUVs. In 2002, the fuel injection system was changed to a multiport system to accommodate California emissions requirements. During this period, power was boosted to 200 horsepower and 250 pound-feet of torque.

Turbocharged

  • A turbocharged version of the Chevy 4.3 made a brief appearance from 1991 through 1993. The engine was used in the GMC Syclone and the GMC Typhoon. These two short-wheelbase SUVs were produced in very limited numbers and employed a Mitsubishi turbocharger and Garrett water-air intercooler and electronic fuel injection. The turbocharged 4.3 generated an impressive 280 horsepower and 360 pound-feet of torque.

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