Who Invented the Koozie?

Save

The beer Koozie is an insulated fabric sleeve that wraps around cans and bottles to keep beer and other beverages cold. When empty it is easily collapsible so it takes up little room when stored. It is unclear who the original inventor is, but a series of U.S. patents trace its history all the way back to 1921 and an invention called a "cozy" for insulating portable gas generators.

The Krazy Koozie

  • In 2007, Kyle Brandon Jones of Glen Rose, Texas, was granted a U.S. patent for the Krazy Koozie. In his patent application, he describes the Krazy Koozie as a device that is similar to a wide variety of other products on the market. Like those other products, the Krazy Koozie wraps around beverage containers and protects the hands from hot drinks and insulates cold beverages. but Jones' Koozie also expands and contracts to hold a variety of different sizes and shapes of beverage containers. Jones' patent application is a useful guide to the history of Koozies because it contains references to related patents that date back to 1921.

The Earliest Koozies

  • David and Russell Duncan patented the earliest known Koozie in 1921 for a "cozy for portable gas generators." The United States granted another related patent in 1929 for a linoleum jacket to William Waggoner.

The First Beverage Koozie

  • The first owner of a patent on a beer Koozie was Bonnie McGough of Caldwell, Idaho. She received her patent in October 1981 for a device she called the "insulated beverage cozy." This insulated cozy was made for use with 12-oz. cans. The cozy had inner and outer fabric walls with a chamber in between for insulating material and an elastic band at the top for holding the beverage snugly inside the cozy.

Improving on Mcgough's Design

  • In 1987, Scott Henderson of Plano, Texas, received a patent for a product he described as a fold-up insulated beverage container holder with a stabilizing support base. This Koozie offered a specially designed base that could collapse with the rest of the Koozie, but which also added stability so that when someone put their Koozie-covered drink down on a flat surface it wouldn't wobble or fall over.

Today's Koozie Market

  • There are so many different Koozies on the market today, it's hard to say who invented what. There is not even any agreement on how to spell the Koozie. It has been referred to as a Koozie, koozy, cosy, cozie, cozy and any other spelling you can imagine. They come in all manner of shapes, colors and sizes. Some have sports team logos on them. Some have beer brewery logos. Some have zippers. Some have buttons. The only thing we can say for sure is that we know a Koozie when we see one.

References

  • Photo Credit Super Nathan on Wikipedia
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

  • History of the Coffee Table

    The coffee table became popular in the early twentieth century. Its use as a table in living rooms and family rooms has...

  • Who Invented Beer?

    Historians believe that prehistoric nomads may have brewed beer from grain before learning to make bread. However, the first records and/or evidence...

  • How to Crochet a Beer Koozie

    Beer koozies let you comfortably hold cold bottles in your hand while drinking. They are also useful for collecting the moisture that...

  • About Neoprene Fabric

    Neoprene is a synthetic rubber with a wide variety of uses. As a fabric, neoprene often has a nylon or spandex backing...

  • Who Invented the First Spray Bottle?

    The spray bottle is a vital part of living. It is used for everything from cleaning products, hair products, to insecticides and...

  • Easy Tea Cozy to Make

    If you drink a lot of tea or enjoy hosting tea parties, you likely own a teapot, If you want to keep...

  • About Fitted Sheets

    Fitted sheets also referred to a bottom sheets and serve as a barrier to protect you from a mattress. Since a mattress...

Related Searches

Read Article

How to Make Roasted Brussels Sprouts

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!